Automated cheese packing – The packing process at the Danish dairy, Ullerslev Mejeri, is automated with a new packing machine that handles different types of cheeses and boxes.

The challenge

The primary packaging process where the cheese is sealed is already automated at the dairy. These are further transported to a working station where the cheese blocks are packed manually in boxes. Ullerslev Mejeri wants this secondary packing process to automate with a case packer and thus eliminate the repetitive strain work.

    

The solution

The new packing line consists of the packing machine – EGApacker, which handles different types of cheese – round, rectangular and moon-shaped, high or low. These are packed into boxes, with patterns ranging from 1 to 6 cheese blocks in a box. For this purpose, Egatec has developed different grippers, which can easily be replaced depending on the type and number of cheese that are to be placed in boxes. Suction tool is used for the rectangular cheese and different grab tools for the round cheese.

    

The cheese is transported into EGApacker on a conveyor and pushed onto a product plate where the desired layer is formed. Meanwhile, the erected box is released from the buffer position. The gripper grabs the cheese and lowers it into the box.

The cardboard magazine, which is integrated inside the packing machine, erects different size of boxes and seals the bottom with tape. The magazine can be adjusted in width and height, so the operator easily can change between the different sizes.

A case sealer – EGAsealer, is also included in the new packing line, where the boxes are top sealed with tape before palletizing.

The entire line from box erecting, change of gripper to top sealing takes about 5 minutes to reset. For Ullerslev Dairy, Egatec has adapted the standard EGApacker, which has been reversed to fit the production layout.

About Ullerslev Mejeri I/S

Ullerslev Dairy is a specialist in cheese packing with a wide range of cheese brands such as “Kong Hans”, “Stærke Ullerslev” and “Snehvide”. Production started back in 1939 with Danablu and Danbo. Today, 95% of the Danablu is exported.

Source: Egatec